SCHOLARLY ACTIVITIES AND OPPORTUNITIES

Type Title Division End Date Post Date
Clinical A Retrospective Review of Hospital onset bacteremia

Chart Review patients retrospectively to look at patient who have had bacteremia while in the hospital.

Minimum training: Student
Site: UIH
Stipend: No
Contact name: Scott Borgetti
Contact email: [email protected]
Posting start date:2020-10-19
Infectious Diseases 10.29.2023
Translational Study of a PST-Trained Voice-Enabled Artificial Intelligence Counselor (SPEAC) for Adults with Emotional Distress (Phase 1)

Depression and anxiety are the leading causes of disability and lost productivity, and are often underdiagnosed and undertreated owing to access, cost, and stigma barriers. Novel and scalable psychotherapies are urgently needed. Advances in artificial intelligence (AI) offer a transformative opportunity to develop intelligent voice assistants as virtual health agents accessible on personal devices. Meanwhile, major advances in human neuroscience have fueled a paradigm shift to study brain mechanisms underlying behavioral health interventions. Leveraging emerging science in these transdisciplinary areas, this project aims to develop and rigorously test a novel voice-enabled, AI virtual agent named Lumen, trained on Problem Solving Therapy (PST), for patients with moderate, untreated depressive and/or anxiety symptoms. The project will investigate the effect of Lumen on engagement of a priori neural targets—amygdala for emotional reactivity and dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) for cognitive control—as putative mechanisms. The project has 2 phases: R61 (years 1-2) and R33 (years 3-5). Focusing on Lumen development and refinement as well as pilot testing, Phase 1 has 2 specific aims. Aim 1 on Lumen development and refinement will proceed in 3 stages: (1) focus groups (n=24 participants), 2) scenario-based clinician evaluations, and (3) a formative user study (n=20 participants). Aim 2 is to pilot test Lumen in a 2-arm randomized clinical trial (pilot RCT), among 60 participants with moderate, untreated depression and/or anxiety who are randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive PST with Lumen (n=40) on a secure study iPad or be on a waitlist (n=20). At weeks 0 and 14 participants will complete functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess neural target engagement as well as validated surveys of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) (e.g., depressive and anxiety symptoms, functioning, quality of life). In addition, participants will complete ecological daily diaries of mood, stress, appraisal and coping for 7 days every 2 weeks during the 14-week follow-up period. The Phase 1 milestones are (1) establishing the functionality, usability, and treatment fidelity of Lumen; and (2) demonstrating feasibility, acceptability, and neural target engagement. Achieving these milestones will provide the basis for the future R33 phase (Phase 2) focused on examining target engagement and PROs in a larger 3-arm RCT by comparing Lumen with a waitlist control arm and an in-person PST arm.

Minimum training: Student
Site: Institute for Health Research and Policy or remote during pandemic
Stipend: No
Contact name: Jun Ma
Contact email: [email protected]
Contact phone number: (312) 413-9830
Posting start date: 2020-07-23
Academic Internal Medicine & Geriatrics 06.30.2022
Basic Science Basic research in type 2 diabetes and obesity

The Layden group focuses its research on type 2 diabetes and obesity. Our laboratory based studies look at novel genetic pathways involved in these diseases utilizing transgenic mouse models and studies with human tissues.  A few examples include investigating how the gut microbiota mediates these metabolic diseases through nutrient sensing receptors, developing novel receptor agonists to treat these diseases, and understanding how glucose is intracellularly metabolized through novel genetic pathways.  Please contact us if interested, to discuss possible projects.

Minimum training: Student
Site: Laboratory
Stipend: No
Contact name: Brian Layden
Contact email: [email protected]
Contact phone number: 773-505-0169
Posting start date: 2017-02-04
Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism 02.14.2023
Clinical Health Disparities and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Chronic Kidney Disease

Epidemiological research involving health disparities and cardiovascular outcomes in chronic kidney disease.

Minimum training: Student
Site: COM, UIC
Stipend: No
Contact name: James P Lash
Contact email: [email protected]
Contact phone number: 312-996-7729
Posting start date: 2016-06-03
Nephrology
*StARR Research*
12.31.2022 9.28.2021
Clinical Endoscopic Mucosal Resection Databse

Retrospective

Contact Name: Brian Boulay
Contact Email: [email protected]

GI 2023
Clinical EUS elastography for pancreatic cancer

Prospective

Contact Name: Brian Boulay
Contact Email: [email protected]

GI 2023
Clinical Dental foreign body ingestion

Retrospective

Contact Name: Anna Lipowska
Contact Email: [email protected]

GI 2023
Clinical Esophageal databse

Prospective and retrospective

Contact Name: Tim McGorisk, Anna Lipowska
Contact Email: [email protected], [email protected]

GI 2023
Clinical The effect of concomitant hepatitis B infection and inflammatory bowel disease on mortality, hospital cost and length of stay: a nationwide inpatient sample study

Retrospective

Contact Name: Asim Shuja
Contact Email: [email protected]

GI 2023
Clinical Trend and incidence of Nephrolithiasis in hospitalized patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) from 2007 to 2016.

Retrospective

Contact Name: Asim Shuja
Contact Email: [email protected]

GI 2023
Clinical Voluntary childlessness in women with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Prospective

Contact Name: Itishree Trivedi
Contact Email: [email protected]

GI 2023
Clinical Cutaneous Crohn’s disease: a case series

Case  Series

Contact Name: Dr. Trivedi
Contact Email: [email protected]

GI 2023
Clinical Diet, visceral adiposity and fatty acids in acute pancreatitis severity

Prospective

Contact Name: Cemal Yazici, Edward Villa
Contact Email: [email protected]

GI 2023
Clinical Mechanism of diabetes from acute pancreatitis in African Americans and Hispanics

Prospective

Contact: Cemal Yazici

Email: [email protected]

GI 2023
Clinical Sleep/circadian related glucose metabolism research

This project looks at the different ways glucose metabolism affects sleep and the circadian rhythm.

Stipend: No
Contact Name: Sirimon Reutrakul
Contact Email: [email protected]

Endocrinology 2023
Basic Science Role of selenium and selenoproteins in arsenic-induced metabolic dysfunction

This project is geared towards medical students. Skills of use include molecular and cell biology techniques, e.g. qRT-PCR, immunoblotting, SDS-PAGE, etc.

Stipend: No
Contact Name: Rob Sargis
Contact Email: [email protected]

Endocrinology 2023
Clinical Environmental exposure to metals/metalloids as drivers of cardiometabolic disease

This is an epidemiological project using data from Starr County, Texas, a predominantly Mexican American region of the country with markedly high rates of diabetes and diabetes-associated mortality.  The goal is to understand the relationship between urinary metal/metalloid levels and cardiometabolic outcomes.  Skills of use include advanced statistical approaches such as SAS, STATA, and R.

Stipend: No
Contact Name: Rob Sargis
Contact Email: [email protected]

Endocrinology 2023
Clinical Disparities in Endocrine Care

Literature review to document disparities in care across all realms of endocrinology, including diabetes, thyroid, pituitary, adrenal, calcium/bone, etc.  It is anticipated that this will be a collaborative project with endocrine fellows and medical students.  This is a new initiative.

Stipend: No
Contact Name: Rob Sargis
Contact Email: [email protected]

Endocrinology 2023
Clinical Land Use, Urban Planning, and New Urbanism in the Genesis and Prevention of Cardiometabolic Diseases

Initially this will be a literature review examining evidence linking land use to cardiometabolic disorders with a primary focus on diabetes.  Extension of this work will examine how land use patterns across Chicago and the U.S. may influence cardiometabolic disease rates.  It is anticipated that this will be a collaborative project with endocrine fellows and medical students.

Stipend: No
Contact Name: Rob Sargis
Contact Email: [email protected]

Endocrinology 2023
Clinical Clinical Care as a Vehicle of Exposure to Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

This project builds off of prior work discussing the ethical implications of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in medications and medical devices.  Opportunities here would include further evaluations of existing literature as well as potential collaborations with the College of Pharmacy to better understand the extent of the risk.  There is potential here to pursue various facets of clinical care.

Stipend: No
Contact Name: Rob Sargis
Contact Email: [email protected]

Endocrinology 2023
Clinical COVID-19 Registry for Research Projects

The core UIC database is housed in REDCap and is derived from data extracted retrospectively from UI Health patient electronic medical records. UIC investigators can apply to use this core database by submitting a Research Concept Form, which will be reviewed by the Registry’s Steering Committee. Upon approval, the investigators will be provided with a deidentified dataset with the requested variables, following the IRB approved process.

Stipend: No
Contact Name: PI Kirstie Danielson, PhD
Contact Email: [email protected]

Endocrinology 2024
Translational Islet cell transplant (ICT) as Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)

Islet cell transplant (ICT) can functionally cure type 1 diabetes (T1D) by restoring insulin-producing β-cells. However, human donor islets are scarce and many recipients convert back to T1D. While ICT is slowly improving, few consistent predictors of ICT outcomes, in particular recipient factors, have been identified. Consequently, there is a critical need to identify modifiable recipient predictors of ICT success. The long-term goal is to further improve ICT precision medicine. Therefore, the objective of this study is to identify modifiable recipient baseline factors that predict ICT clinical outcomes, to focus the development of feasible, effective pre-ICT interventions to enhance success. Our compelling preliminary data found that greater β-cell function up to one year following first ICT was significantly related to recipient baseline levels of markers of better vascular health: higher HDL, lower blood pressure, narrower carotid intima-media thickness (all clinically available), and lower intercellular adhesion molecule-1. These data are the basis for our central hypothesis: favorable recipient baseline vascular health predicts better ICT outcomes, mediated by enhanced recipient insulin sensitivity and lower β-cell death. Please contact PI for further information.

Stipend: No
Contact Name: PI Kirstie Danielson, PhD
Contact Email: [email protected]

Endocriniolgy 2024
Quality improvement Lung cancer screening of high risk veterans QI project

Educating high risk veterans at Jesse Brown VA Medical Center on the need  to undergo lung cancer screening with low dose CT of the chest using a short, professional video we’ve developed with experts at the VA.

Stipend: No
Contact Name: Israel Rubinstein, M.D.
Contact Email: [email protected]

Pulmonary, Critcal Care, Sleep & Allergy 2023 9/13/2021
Translational/ Basic Microbiome in health and disease

Our research interests are host-microbiome interactions in health and disease. Our research is supported by the NIH, DOD, VA, and a few other research awards.

https://cancer.uillinois.edu/member/jun-sun-phd/

Minimum training: Resident, Fellow
Stipend: No
Contact Name: Jun Sun, PhD
Contact Email: [email protected]
Contact Phone: 312-996-5020

Gastroenterology and Hepatology
*StARR Research*
2023 9/17/2021
Clinical/
Translational
Study of a PST-Trained Voice-Enabled Artificial Intelligence Counselor (SPEAC) for Adults with Emotional Distress

Project Description: https://reporter.nih.gov/search/5zEMeGHv8k-cUrP4eZmT2A/project-details/10031359

Minimum training: Student, Resident, Fellow
Site: UIC Westside Research Office Bldg. 1747 W Roosevelt Rd, Chicago, IL 60608
Stipend: No
Contact Name: Jun Ma, MD, PhD/ Study Coordinator: Amruta Barve
Contact Email: [email protected]

Academic Internal Medicine & Geriatrics
*StARR Research*
2023 10/13/2021
Clinical/
Translational
The ALOHA trial: Addressing Quality of Life, Clinical Outcomes, and Mechanisms in Uncontrolled Asthma Following the DASH Dietary Pattern

Project Description: https://reporter.nih.gov/search/qKpOCxOvFUa9yemAI8aLNg/project-details/10295652

Minimum training: Student, Resident, Fellow
Site: UIC Westside Research Office Bldg. 1747 W Roosevelt Rd, Chicago, IL 60608
Stipend: No
Contact Name: Jun Ma, MD, PhD/ Study Coordinator: Amruta Barve
Contact Email: [email protected]

Academic Internal Medicine & Geriatrics
*StARR Research*
2023 10/13/2021
Clinical Ventricular Arrhythmias in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the most common structural genetic disorders of hemoglobin, affecting around 100,000 patients in the U.S.,1 most often African-Americans.2 Advances in the care of SCD have improved life expectancy and quality of life but the improved survival of patients has resulted in a rise in the incidence of chronic cardiopulmonary manifestations of the disease such as myocardial infarction (MI), pulmonary hypertension (PH), left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmias.3  Although cardiac autonomic dysfunction, ischemic episodes, QT interval prolongation and myocardial fibrosis have been proposed, the underlying mechanisms for the increased incidence of cardiac arrhythmias in SCD patients remains unclear.4,5,6 Previous studies showed that a prolonged QT interval and ventricular tachyarrhythmias were significant predictors of worse outcomes including greater hospital length of stay and increased mortality as compared to a cohort without arrhythmias.7,8 However, the risk factors associated with increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias in patients with SCD remains unknown.We hypothesize that hemolysis per se leads to structural and biochemical changes that increase the risk of developing ventricular arrhythmias in patients with SCD. We will evaluate the incidence and prevalence and identify risk factors for the development of ventricular arrhythmias in hereditary hemolytic anemias (HHA) in a single center, retrospective analysis. Utilizing our well-characterized registry of 1039 HHA patients, we will examine demographic, comorbid, laboratory, and echocardiographic parameters and correlate cardiac structural and hemodynamic parameters and hemolytic profile with ventricular arrhythmia development.

Minimum Training: Ideally for Resident-scholar
Stipend: No
Contact Name: Dawood Darbar, MD
Contact Email: [email protected]

Cardiology & Hematology/Oncology
*StARR Research*
2023 10/13/2021
Clinical/QI Multiple projects in Cardiology

Project Description:

  • cardiac disease prevention (inclusive of healthcare disparities)
  • quality improvement (and operations)
  • cardiac imaging (especially CMR)

Minimum training: Resident, Fellow, Postdoc
Site: UIC
Stipend: No
Contact Name: Noreen Nazir, MD
Contact Email: [email protected]

Cardiology 2024 02/15/2022
Clinical Air filtration to improve indoor air quality (IAQ) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) outcomes in a high-risk urban population of U.S. military veterans

Project Description: The primary goal of this HUD-funded study (ILHHU0049-19) is to investigate the effectiveness of stand-alone air filtration for improving indoor air quality (IAQ) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) outcomes in a high-risk urban cohort of 80 U.S. military veterans with COPD. Additional secondary goals of the study are to: (1) investigate housing-related factors that may contribute to COPD exacerbation; (2) investigate the utility of using low-cost sensors for indoor air pollution epidemiology studies and for providing actionable or useful information on the quality of their indoor air to patients and their physicians, and (3) evaluate the costs and benefits of using stand-alone air filtration to improve IAQ and COPD outcomes. Participants will be recruited from the Jesse Brown Veterans Affairs Medical Center using a community-based participatory process in which stakeholders, including patients, physicians, and local nonprofits, will assist in the development of research objectives, recruitment, retention, and dissemination of results. The study objectives will be met by combining measurements of environmental conditions and indoor and outdoor air quality (using both research-grade and low-cost sensors) with housing condition assessments, respiratory questionnaires, and records of clinical outcomes.

This study addresses significant unmet household and medical needs among high-risk Veterans with COPD and is co-led by investigators at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago.

Minimum training: Resident, Fellow
Site: Jesse Brown VA Medical Center
Stipend: No
Contact Name: Israel Rubinstein, MD
Contact Email: [email protected]

Pulmonary, Critical Care, Sleep & Allergy 2024 02/15/2022
Basic Science Role of the novel hexokinase, HKDC1 in hepatocellular carcinoma: Focus on mitochondrial metabolism

Project Description: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 4th leading cause of cancer related deaths. Hexokinases (HK) are the proximal enzymes in glucose metabolism and the recently discovered novel 5th HK, hexokinase domain containing 1 (HKDC1) has been shown to be upregulated in HCC where it has a role in HCC development and progression by modulating cellular metabolism. However, the exact mechanism by which HKDC1 modulates cancer cell metabolism remains unknown, which is the focus here. In our preliminary studies, using multiple cellular and animal models, we have demonstrated our novel findings that HKDC1 modulates glucose flux through its interaction with the mitochondria thereby mediating YAP (an HCC driver) stability and influencing HCC progression. We further show that glucose can affect HKDC1 protein stability in HCC. Our overall hypothesis is that HKDC1 mediates glucose metabolism via its interaction at the mitochondria to drive YAP-mediated proliferation of HCC in a glucose-dependent manner. This hypothesis will be examined through three independent Aims. First (Aim 1), we will determine the mechanistic basis of glucose mediated regulation of HKDC1 protein stability in HCC by using cellular models of HKDC1 gain/loss. Second (Aim 2), we will define the role of HKDC1’s interaction with the mitochondria in HCC progression by using our unique liver-specific HKDC1 gain/loss models coupled with HCC mouse models.  And lastly (Aim 3), we will determine the mechanism by which HKDC1 modulates glucose flux to mediates YAP stability and enhance HCC proliferation using both in vitro and in vivo models coupled with genetic and pharmacological tools. These three Aims will together establish the role of HKDC1 in development of HCC and examine the feasibility of targeting it for therapy.

Minimum training: Student, Resident, Fellow
Site: 835 S Wolcott Ave, Lab 602
Stipend: No
Contact Name: Wasim Khan, MD
Contact Email: [email protected]

Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism 2024 02/15/2022
Clinical/QI Clinical and Procedural Outcomes for Patients being treated with an invasive approach for Pulmonary Embolism (PE) at UIC and JBVA

Project Description:We are focused on tracking procedural and clinical outcomes for patients undergoing lytic therapy or catheter based thrombectomy

Minimum training: Student, Resident, Fellow
Site: UIC
Stipend: No
Contact Name: Adhir Shroff/Khalil Ibrahim/Amer Ardati
Contact Email: [email protected]

Cardiology 02/15/2022
Clinical/QI Clinical and Procedural Outcomes for Structural Heart Disease Procedures at UIC and JBVA

Project Description:We are focused on tracking procedural and clinical outcomes for patients undergoing TAVR, TEER and LAAO procedures.

Minimum training: Student, Resident, Fellow
Site: UIC
Stipend: No
Contact Name: Adhir Shroff/Khalil Ibrahim
Contact Email: [email protected]

Cardiology 02/15/2022
Translational Estrogen as a Novel Therapy for Acute Lung Injury

Project Description: Our lab has previously identified claudin-5, a tight junctional protein, as a critical mediator of endothelial cell barrier function and we have reported that the upregulation of claudin-5 is associated with lung vascular protection in a mouse model of acute lung injury (ALI).  Existing evidence of increased claudin-5 expression by estrogen coupled with clinical evidence of gender differences in ALI outcomes suggest that the administration of estrogen may represent a novel ALI therapy.  This project would investigate the effects of estrogen on lung endothelial cell signaling and function, both in vitro and in vivo, in a mouse model of ALI.

This is a StARR research opportunity.  No prior research experience required.

Minimum training: Student, Resident, Fellow
Site: COMRB
Stipend: No
Contact Name: Jeffrey Jacobson, MD
Contact Email: [email protected]

Pulmonary, Critical Care, Sleep & Allergy
*StARR Research*
2024 02/15/2022
Clinical/
Translational
Diet and Microbiome Related Projects (Multiple)

Project Description: The Mutlu Lab has multiple projects examining the role of diet and microbiome in the development of colon polyps, breast cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. The lab has a large tissue bank with corresponding metadata. A number of ongoing projects examine steroid hormone metabolism by gut bacteria in human specimens; methanogens in diverticulosis and colon polyps; and the role of diet interventions in inflammatory bowel disease. Projects that examine environmental factors that affect the gut microbiome are also ongoing. Clinical projects involving tissue and data collection from patients can also be completed for candidates who need longer term projects.

Most work will involve human subjects. Thus, for most projects, before any research can take place, human subjects’ training and certification will need to be completed using the UIC CITI training modules. Those who contemplate to do bench work will also be required to complete Bioraft training, some of which may be in person. As such, candidates are asked to contact us in advance of their contemplated research time. Those who have a strong background in advanced math and/or statistics and/or bioinformatics are highly encouraged to work with us on our existing data.

Minimum training: Student, Resident, Fellow
Site: Gastroenterology- 840 S Wood, 7th Floor
Stipend: No
Contact Name: Ece Mutlu, MD, MS or Lucille Ray, PhD
Contact Email: [email protected] or [email protected]

Gastroenterology and Hepatology 2024 03/07/2022
Quality Improvement Jesse Brown for Black Lives (JB4BL) Clinical Committee

JB4BL is an interdisciplinary task force whose mission is to address racial disparities in clinical care through anti-racism advocacy, educational initiatives, and quality improvement projects at the Jesse Brown VA.  There are currently four active sub-committees:

  1. Clinical Algorithms Subcommittee (Aim: advocating for the removal of race in clinical algorithms that exacerbate health disparities)
  2. Substance Use Disorder Subcommittee (Aim: Improve management of substance use disorder through evidence based clinical approaches and not criminalization)
  3. Pharmacy Subcommittee (Aim: Examine disparities in prescribing patterns)

Minimum training: Student, resident, fellow, faculty
Site: Jesse Brown VA (virtual meeting options)
Stipend: No (*some individual projects have potential for stipends)
Contact Name: Cheryl Conner MD, MPH or Marci Laragh MD
Contact Email: [email protected] ; [email protected]
Contact Phone: 312-569-8001

Interdisciplinary 2023 03/28/2022

INSTRUCTIONS: In order to add a sidebar anchor:

  1. Duplicate the existing item, listed as a 1/6 text field. (Or create a 1/6 column and add a text field, modify the class so it’s exactly “additionalAnchor”).
  2. Modify the text field inside the 1/6 column. Inside there, modify the HYPERLINK so that it would go to a corresponding section with a “#” in front of it. (Example, we have a “chief” section on the page, then it would make sense to have the hyperlink go to “#chief”)
  3. Then change the hyperlink TEXT to a appropriate label.
  4. IMPORTANT: If not done already, go into that CONTAINER that corresponds to your anchor (i.e. Meet The Chiefs), and add an ID matching the anchor’s HYPERLINK WITHOUT the “#”, i.e. “chief”.
  5. (If using side bar widget box, then there’s a saved copy of a widget box COLUMN, grab it in the column library, it should 1/6 of a length of a column.)

NOTE: Order added to the sidebar is from last to first.