Masahito Jimbo, MD, PhD, MPH, FAAFP

Department Head, Visiting Professor of Family and Community Medicine Family and Community Medicine
Photo of Masahito Jimbo MD, PhD, MPH, FAAFP

Biographical Info

TITLE: Department Head, Visiting Professor of Family and Community Medicine

MEDICAL SCHOOL: Keio University School of Medicine

 

RESIDENCY: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital

 

OTHER TRAINING: Internal medicine and nephrology, Keio University Hospital

 

AREAS OF INTEREST:  patient/physician communication, shared decision making, cancer screening and prevention, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, inpatient medicine

 

BRIEF BIO: Dr. Jimbo is a family physician researcher who has worked extensively in primary care practice quality improvement. Having worked in both urban and rural underserved areas, he has first-hand knowledge of how competing issues can crowd out important patient education during the patients’ visit with their physicians. Initially trained in basic laboratory research, he has obtained expertise in behavioral intervention and research through formal training in public health at the University of North Carolina and hands-on research to improve colorectal cancer screening at Thomas Jefferson University. He has obtained major funding from the National Cancer Institute to investigate patient and clinician communication utilizing decision aids and shared decision making, cancer screening and prevention in primary care, and clinician acceptance of practice interventions. He has worked extensively in the areas of inpatient medicine, guidelines development, population-based medicine, and faculty development. As the Department Head, Dr. Jimbo aims to continue the department’s excellence in all areas of academic family and community medicine.

 

AWARDS & DISTINCTIONS:

1990: Fellow, Japanese Society of Internal Medicine.

2001: Residency Teaching Award, Department of Family Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University.

2007: Top Reviewer, Journal of American Board of Family Medicine.

2009, 2010, 2014: Residency Award for Excellence in Teaching, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.

2011: America’s Top Doctors.

2011: Best Doctors in America.

2011: Metro Detroit’s Best Doctors.

2015: Appreciation Award, Japanese Business Society of Detroit.

2015: Outstanding Reviewer, American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

2018: Fellow, Association of Departments of Family Medicine.

2020: Fellow, American Academy of Family Physicians

 

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS & PRESENTATIONS:

  • Jimbo M, Nease DE, Jr, Ruffin, MT IV, Rana GK. Information technology and cancer prevention. CA Cancer J Clin, 2006; 56(1):26-36.
  • Jimbo M, Meyer B, Hyslop T, Cocroft J, Turner BJ, Weinberg DS, Myers RE. Effectiveness of complete diagnostic examination in clinical practice settings. Cancer Detect Prev, 2006; 30(6):545-551.
  • Ruffin MT, Fetters MD, Jimbo M. Preference-based electronic decision aid to promote colorectal cancer screening: Results of a randomized control trial. Prev Med, 2007; 45(4):267-73.
  • Richardson CR, Newton TL, Abraham JJ, Sen A, Jimbo M, Swartz AM. A meta-analysis of pedometer-based walking interventions and weight loss. Ann Fam Med, 2008; 6(1):69-77.
  • Nease DE Jr, Ruffin MT 4th, Klinkman MS, Jimbo M, Braun TM, Underwood JM. Impact of a generalizable reminder system on colorectal cancer screening in diverse primary care practices: A report from the prompting and reminding at encounters for prevention project. Med Care, 2008; 46(9 Suppl 1):S68-73.
  • Jimbo M, Myers RE, Meyer B, et al. Reasons patients with a positive fecal occult blood test do not undergo complete diagnostic evaluation. Ann Fam Med, 2009; 7:11-16.
  • Ruffin M, Creswell JW, Jimbo M, Fetters MD. Factors influencing choices for colorectal cancer screening among previously unscreened African and Caucasian Americans. J Community Health, 2009; 34(2):79-89.
  • Jimbo M, Rana GK, Hawley S, Holmes-Rovner M, Kelly-Blake K, Nease DE, Jr, Ruffin, MT IV. What is lacking in current decision aids on cancer screening? CA Cancer J Clin 2013; 63:193-214. PMCID: PMC3644368. NIHMSID: NIHMS438825.
  • Pelletier-Cameron A, Heidelbaugh JB, Jimbo M. Diagnosis and office based treatment of urinary incontinence in adults: Part 1. Diagnosis and testing. Therapeutic Advances in Urology, 2013; 5 (4):181-187.
  • Pelletier-Cameron A, Jimbo M, Heidelbaugh JB. Diagnosis and office-based treatment of urinary incontinence in adults: Part 2. Treatment. Therapeutic Advances in Urology, 2013; 5 (4):189-200.
  • Jimbo M, Kelly-Blake K, Sen A, Hawley ST, Ruffin MT. Decision Aid to technologically enhance shared decision making (DATES): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Trials 2013; 14:381 (doi:10.1186/1745-6215-14-381).
  • Feldman-Stewart D, O’Brien MA, Clayman ML, Davison BJ, Jimbo M, Labrecque M, Martin RM, Shepherd H. Providing information about options in patient decision aids. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making 2013, 13(Suppl 2):S4. Available at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6947/13/S2/S4.
  • Jimbo M, Shultz CG, Nease DE, Fetters MD, Power D, Ruffin MT. Perceived barriers and facilitators of using a web-based interactive decision aid for colorectal cancer screening in community practice settings: findings from focus groups with primary care clinicians and medical office staff. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2013;15(12):e286. URL: http://www.jmir.org/2013/12/e286/. (doi:10.2196/jmir.2914). PMID: 24351420.
  • Resnicow K, Zhou Y, Hawley S, Jimbo M, Ruffin MT, Davis RE, Shires D, Lafata JE. Communication preference moderates the effect of a tailored intervention to increase colorectal cancer screening among African Americans. Patient Educ and Couns. 2014 Sep 3. pii: S0738-3991(14)00362-0. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2014.08.013. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25224317.
  • Shultz C, Jimbo M. Decision aid use in primary care: an overview and theory-based framework. Fam Med 2015; 47 (9):679-692.
  • Osawa T, Wittmann D, Jimbo M*, Keller E, Namiki S, Abe T, Shinohara N, Skolarus T. Providing prostate cancer survivorship care in Japan: implications from the US care model. Int J Urol 2016 Nov;23(11):906-915.
  • Jimbo M, Sen A, Plegue MA, Hawley ST, Kelly-Blake K, Rapai M, Zhang M, Zhang Y, Ruffin MT. Correlates of patient intent and preference on colorectal cancer screening. Am J Prev Med 2017;52(4):443-450.
  • Jimbo M, Sen A, Plegue MA, Hawley ST, Kelly-Blake K, Rapai M, Zhang M, Zhang Y, Xie X, Ruffin MT. Interactivity in a decision aid: Findings from a Decision Aid to Technologically Enhance Shared Decision Making RCT. Am J Prev Med 2019;57(1): 77–86. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2019.03.004.
  • Harper D, Plegue M, Harmes K, Jimbo M, Sheinfeld Gorin S. Three large scale surveys highlight the complexity of cervical cancer under-screening among women 45-65 years of age in the United States. Prev Med. 2020 Jan;130:105880. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.105880. Epub 2019 Nov 1.
  • Sheinfeld Gorin S, Jimbo M, Heizelman R, Harmes KM, Harper DM. The future of cancer screening after COVID-19 may be at home. Cancer. 2021 Feb 15;127(4):498-503. doi: 10.1002/cncr.33274. Epub 2020 Nov 10. PMID: 33170520.
  • Harper DM, Jimbo M. Elimination of cervical cancer depends on HPV vaccination and primary HPV screening. The Lancet Infectious Diseases. (in press)
Categories: Department of Family Medicine, Department of Family Medicine - Faculty
Updated 7 months ago.